Narcissists prone to pornography addiction, say psychologists

One of the more popular portrayals of the narcissist is as someone who cannot stop looking at themselves in the mirror. However, some contemporary psychologists argue that many narcissists spend an inordinate amount of time looking at pornography. According to a study conducted in June of 2014, and published in the Journal of Sex & Marital Therapy, sex addicts who had viewed pornography during any point in the past exhibited higher scores on measures of narcissism.

The researchers, Mary Beth Short, Alex Clinton Milan and Thomas Edward Kasper, used the Index of Sexual Narcissism (ISN), Pathological Narcissism Inventory (PNI) and the Narcissistic Personality Inventory to gauge measures of narcissism. According to Lisa E. Scott, an adjunct professor at Loyola University Chicago where she teaches Organizational Psychology, narcissists suffer from a major “madonna/whore complex.” They feel a need to see women as either exciting and sexy, or sexless and saintly. The narcissist quickly loses romantic interest in a woman if she is caring, kind and sweet. Once a woman becomes a such a woman in the narcissist’s eyes, the male narcissist is more likely to turn to pornography because of the pure, intimacy-less excitement provided by porn.

According to Robert Weiss LCSW, CSAT-S is Senior Vice President of National Clinical Development for Elements Behavioral Health, many porn addicts use their supply to enjoy the sense of control and escape it provides. He says that narcissists struggle with overwhelming feelings of worthlessness, and pornography provides, among other things, a means of soothing the pain caused by intense and intense feelings of inadequacy, worthlessness and shame. He says that intense and chronic low self-esteem are virtually universal among sex addicts. These feelings may be the result of neglect or abuse (sexual or otherwise). He adds that sexual fantasies and sexual acting out helps these emotionally and psychologically vulnerable narcissists to feel emotionally safe against shame and humiliation, distracting them from the intense pain brought on by low self-esteem.

One of the more popular portrayals of the narcissist is as someone who cannot stop looking at themselves in the mirror. However, some contemporary psychologists argue that many narcissists spend an inordinate amount of time looking at pornography. According to a study conducted in June of 2014, and published in the Journal of Sex & Marital Therapy, sex addicts who had viewed pornography during any point in the past exhibited higher scores on measures of narcissism.

The researchers, Mary Beth Short, Alex Clinton Milan and Thomas Edward Kasper, used the Index of Sexual Narcissism (ISN), Pathological Narcissism Inventory (PNI) and the Narcissistic Personality Inventory to gauge measures of narcissism. According to Lisa E. Scott, an adjunct professor at Loyola University Chicago where she teaches Organizational Psychology, narcissists suffer from a major “madonna/whore complex.” They feel a need to see women as either exciting and sexy, or sexless and saintly. The narcissist quickly loses romantic interest in a woman if she is caring, kind and sweet. Once a woman becomes a such a woman in the narcissist’s eyes, the male narcissist is more likely to turn to pornography because of the pure, intimacy-less excitement provided by porn.

According to Robert Weiss LCSW, CSAT-S is Senior Vice President of National Clinical Development for Elements Behavioral Health, many porn addicts use their supply to enjoy the sense of control and escape it provides. He says that narcissists struggle with overwhelming feelings of worthlessness, and pornography provides, among other things, a means of soothing the pain caused by intense and intense feelings of inadequacy, worthlessness and shame. He says that intense and chronic low self-esteem are virtually universal among sex addicts. These feelings may be the result of neglect or abuse (sexual or otherwise). He adds that sexual fantasies and sexual acting out helps these emotionally and psychologically vulnerable narcissists to feel emotionally safe against shame and humiliation, distracting them from the intense pain brought on by low self-esteem

By Cpl. Matthew Manning

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